Community Meeting 2016

28 - 29 Jul, 2016 Auditorium, level 5 Ion Orchard Singapore

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Geography | Climate | Geography 2


Please join us for Community Meeting 2016.


Geography

Singapore consists of 63 islands, including the main island, Pulau Ujong.[38] There are two man-made connections to Johor, Malaysia: the Johor–Singapore Causeway in the north and the Tuas Second Link in the west. Jurong Island, Pulau Tekong, Pulau Ubin and Sentosa are the largest of Singapore's smaller islands. The highest natural point is Bukit Timah Hill at 163.63 m (537 ft).[39]

Ongoing land reclamation projects have increased Singapore's land area from 581.5 km2 (224.5 sq mi) in the 1960s to 719.1 km2 (277.6 sq mi) in 2015, an increase of some 23% (130 km2).[9][40] The country is projected to grow by another 100 km2 (40 sq mi) by 2030.[41] Some projects involve merging smaller islands through land reclamation to form larger, more functional islands, as has been done with Jurong Island.[42]

The Singapore Botanic Gardens is the only tropical garden to be inscribed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Nearly 10% of Singapore's land has been set aside for parks and nature reserves. The network of nature reserves, parks, park connectors, nature ways, tree-lined roads and other natural areas have enhanced the sense of green space in the city.[43] This is a result of five decades of greening efforts, which began in 1963, when Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew launched Singapore's first tree-planting campaign by planting a mempat tree (Cratoxylum formosum). The aim was to soften the harshness of urbanisation and improve the quality of life.[44] This initiative continued into the 1970s and 1980s under the Parks and Recreation Department (PRD), renamed the National Parks Board (abbreviation: NParks) in July 1996.

Due to these efforts, Singapore was ranked fourth in the 2014 Environmental Performance Index, which measures the effectiveness of state policies for environmental sustainability.[45]

Climate

Singapore has a tropical rainforest climate (Köppen: Af ) with no distinctive seasons, uniform temperature and pressure, high humidity, and abundant rainfall. Temperatures usually range from 22 to 35 °C (72 to 95 °F). Relative humidity averages around 79% in the morning and 73% in the afternoon.[46] April and May are the hottest months, with the wetter monsoon season from November to January.[47]

From July to October, there is often haze caused by bush fires in neighbouring Indonesia, usually from the island of Sumatra.[48] Although Singapore does not observe daylight saving time (DST), it follows the GMT+8 time zone, one hour ahead of the typical zone for its geographical location.

Geography 2

Singapore consists of 63 islands, including the main island, Pulau Ujong.[38] There are two man-made connections to Johor, Malaysia: the Johor–Singapore Causeway in the north and the Tuas Second Link in the west. Jurong Island, Pulau Tekong, Pulau Ubin and Sentosa are the largest of Singapore's smaller islands. The highest natural point is Bukit Timah Hill at 163.63 m (537 ft).[39]

Ongoing land reclamation projects have increased Singapore's land area from 581.5 km2 (224.5 sq mi) in the 1960s to 719.1 km2 (277.6 sq mi) in 2015, an increase of some 23% (130 km2).[9][40] The country is projected to grow by another 100 km2 (40 sq mi) by 2030.[41] Some projects involve merging smaller islands through land reclamation to form larger, more functional islands, as has been done with Jurong Island.[42]

The Singapore Botanic Gardens is the only tropical garden to be inscribed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Nearly 10% of Singapore's land has been set aside for parks and nature reserves. The network of nature reserves, parks, park connectors, nature ways, tree-lined roads and other natural areas have enhanced the sense of green space in the city.[43] This is a result of five decades of greening efforts, which began in 1963, when Prime Minister Lee Kuan Yew launched Singapore's first tree-planting campaign by planting a mempat tree (Cratoxylum formosum). The aim was to soften the harshness of urbanisation and improve the quality of life.[44] This initiative continued into the 1970s and 1980s under the Parks and Recreation Department (PRD), renamed the National Parks Board (abbreviation: NParks) in July 1996.

Due to these efforts, Singapore was ranked fourth in the 2014 Environmental Performance Index, which measures the effectiveness of state policies for environmental sustainability.[45]

 

Community Meeting 2016

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